Quick Brush

Self-sampling HPV device

Quick Brush is a self-sampling HPV device that’s a reliable alternative to a pap smear. It is a simple, quick and discreet way to test for high-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV), which is responsible for approximately 90% of HPV-associated cervical cancers.

Why Quick Brush?

Quick Brush is a self–sampling intravaginal device that allows the collection of cervicovaginal fluid as an alternative to pap smear. It is a simple, quick and discreet manner of collecting samples to test for the presence of HPV.

The easy to use device is designed to be inserted in the same way as a sanitary tampon. The sample is then sent to the pathology laboratory by the healthcare professional or women’s health clinic.

Our goal is to reduce the barriers that prevent women from screening for HPV.  We believe that by offering alternative means to testing that we can significantly improve screening rates.

Regular HPV screening can prevent cervical cancer. However, many women who would benefit from HPV testing are not engaging with existing services, either due to availability in their area or due to constraints in time, costs involved, or perception about how the process is carried out. Quick Brush helps to overcome these issues by allowing a screening sample to be taken in the privacy of the woman’s home or health clinic.

Benefits of Quick Brush

  • The design mimics most commercially available sanitary tampons, making the procedure familiar, therefore minimising apprehension of incorrect insertion and positioning.
  • Suitable for practitioner-collected or self-sampled specimens.
  • An ideal solution for self-sampling: collecting, shipping and ease of processing in the laboratory.
  • The soft and flexible brush collects sufficient cell material, regardless of the age or health of the woman concerned.

Frequently asked*

What is HPV?
Human papillomavirus (HPV) is transmitted through sexual contact and is responsible for the majority of cervical cancer diagnosed in women. It’s estimated that 1 in 2 will contract the virus during their lifetime. Like most STDs, HPV is mostly symptomless and requires a test to detect the virus.
How is HPV transmitted?
Certain types of HPV cause genital warts and other lesions, but the virus usually causes no symptoms. That is why regular examinations and cervical screen tests are so important. Quick Brush does not test for the strains that cause genital warts.
What are the symptoms of an HPV infection?
There is no cure or treatment for HPV. It will, in the majority of cases, be cleared by your immune system. Most cases of HPV infection are cleared by the body in one to two years, however some strains of HPV may lead to cervical cancer. That’s why regular examinations and cervical screening tests are so important.
What are the symptoms of cervical cancer?
  • Bleeding after intercourse, douching, or a pelvic examination.
  • Bleeding after menopause.
  • Blood spots or light bleeding between or following periods.
  • Increased vaginal discharge.
  • Menstrual bleeding that is longer and heavier than usual.
  • Pain during sexual intercourse.
  • Unexplained, persistent pelvic and/or back pain.
What does it mean if my results are negative or positive for HPV?
Negative result: The lab did not detect high-risk HPV strains, so your risk of developing cervical cancer is extremely low. No additional screening is needed for 5 years for women over 30. If you are under 30 it is still recommended that you test every 5 years.

Positive result: This means the lab detected one or more high-risk strains of HPV. This is not a cancer diagnosis. It just means you are at a higher likelihood of getting cervical cancer. It’s recommended that you follow up in person with your healthcare professional for routine monitoring and testing.

What is the difference between pap smear and HPV test?
During a Pap test (Pap smear), your doctor or healthcare professional takes a sample of cells from your cervix. The sample is sent to a laboratory to check for any changes or abnormalities in the cells. The Pap test relies on cell changes being visible under a microscope.

During a HPV test, a sample of cells is taken from your cervix in the same way it is for a Pap test. Instead of looking for cell changes in your cervix, the HPV test looks for the types of human papillomavirus (HPV) which can cause cells to change and, in some cases, cause cervical cancer.

What does the Quick Brush device look for?
During a HPV test, a sample of cells is taken from your cervix in the same way it is for a Pap smear. Instead of looking for cell changes in your cervix, the HPV test looks for the types of human papillomavirus (HPV) which can cause cells to change and, in some cases, cause cervical cancer.
If I test positive for HPV do I have cervical cancer?
Positive result: This means the lab detected one or more high-risk strains of HPV. This is not a cancer diagnosis. It just means you are at a higher likelihood of getting cervical cancer. It’s recommended that you follow up in person with your healthcare professional for routine monitoring and testing.
Can I use Quick Brush if I have been previously diagnosed with cervical cancer?
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Can I use the Quick Brush while I'm on my period?
The best time to screen for HPV is at least 5 days after the end of your menstrual period. A HPV test can be done during your menstrual period, but it is better to schedule the test at another time.
How much does the Quick Brush HPV self-sampling kit cost?

Quick Brush self-sampling HPV device may be purchased online for AUD $20 + postage and handling.

Peace of mind in 3 steps

request a quick brush device

Add a Quick Brush self-sampling HPV device to the cart and pay by credit card. We’ll send your kit to you in discreet packaging.

self sample at home

Follow the simple instructions provided with your self-sampling device. Enclose the sample in the supplied plastic bag.

visit your gp

Take your sample to your clinician or healthcare professional who will send it to their pathology provider for testing.

Quick Brush self-sampling device

Quick Brush is a self–sampling intra vaginal device that allows the collection of cervicovaginal fluid as an alternative to Pap Smear. It is a simple, quick and discreet manner of collecting samples to test for the presence of HPV.

 

Before sampling

The product size and insertion method are almost identical to most commercially available tampons, which make the procedure easy and familiar.

After sampling

The white protective cap is placed over the brush to protect the sampled cells. The sample is then sent to the pathology laboratory by your healthcare professional.

Quick Brush device

Quick Brush is made of low-density medical grade polyethene. It consists of an inner tube that allows for insertion and a retractable stem that preserves the sample for transportation.

Quick Brush allows women to take charge of their health outcomes.